The Apple IIe

Codename: Diana, LCA
CPU: MOS Technology/SynerTek 6502/65C02 (IIe "enhanced")
CPU speed: 1 Mhz
FPU: none
motherboard RAM: 64 k (128 k IIe "enhanced")
maximum RAM: 128 k, with 80-Column card (several MB via 3rd party boards)
number of sockets: n/a (RAM expansion via 1st expansion slot)
minimum speed: n/a
ROM: 16/32 k (IIe "enhanced")
L1 cache: n/a
L2 cache: n/a
data path: 8 bit
bus speed: 1 Mhz
slots: 8 proprietary
SCSI: none (upgrade cards later available)
Serial Ports: optional expansion card
ADB: none
Floppy: optional
HD: none
Display: 40 column text, 1 bit color at 560x192, 4 bit color at 140x192
IIe enhanced: 80 column
Sound Output: built in speaker
power: ??
introduced: January 1983
terminated: mid-1993

Released in January 1983, The Apple IIe was to be one of the most successful Apple computers ever. It was based on the 65C02 processor, which could run at 1.02 Mhz. It came with 64K of RAM and a 32K ROM which included BASIC, an assembly language interface, and several other hard-coded options. The Apple IIe originally sold for $1,395, and had a number of improvements and facelifts until it was finally discontinued in mid 1993, making it the only Apple computer be in production for more than 10 years. (pictured left is the updated Apple IIe "Extended", circa 1987)


Date: Wed, 5 Mar 1997 14:19:10 -0800 (PST)
From: john.huber@etak.com (John Huber)
To: opinions@apple-history.pair.com
Subject: Apple History suggestion

You should mention that the Apple IIe included the new ProDOS operating system, which was essentially a port of the Apple III's SOS. ProDOS made the IIe the easiest-to-use computer of its time.
Date: Fri, 7 Nov 1997 04:09:35 -0500 (EST)
From: Neil McNeight (mcneight@umich.edu)
To: opinions@apple-history.pair.com
Subject: Apple IIe and ProDOS

On your site, it mentions that "the Apple IIe included the new ProDOS operating system". This is not entirely true. It is true that the IIe was the first Apple that was shipped with ProDOS, but the first IIe's came with the then standard of DOS 3.3. It wasn't until 1984 or so that ProDOS came around.
Date: Wed, 12 Nov 1997 10:21:34 +0000
From: Sidney A Powers (sapowers@ix.netcom.com)
To: glen@apple-history.pair.com
Subject: Apple IIe

With regard to your histories of the II series. The II and IIplus had ony upper case letter capability built it. There was a software enhancement that allowed one to use lower case letters but as I remember it, the software was not user friendly. The one big improvement on the IIe was a built-in capabily for upper and lower case usage. That was a big step forward.
Date: Fri, 21 Nov 1997 22:13:56 -0500
From: Peter Chin (chinp@ms.com)
To: glen@apple-history.pair.com
Subject: Nit - picking / Apple IIe

I don't remember this 'software' modification. What I do remember is that there were basically two ways lower case got supported on the II/II+ series:

-- Have the program offer its own kludge. Magic Window II, ScreenWriter I & II, Bank Street Writer, among others, allowed you to use the "ESC" key to toggle between upper and lower case. On machines like the upgraded II's and II+'s this was the only way to get lower case input.

-- Perform the 'Shift Key" modification.

You ran a wire from the keyboard encoder to a pin/contact on the game controller input socket. Wacky, but it worked. What was even more incredulous was that most word processors that were written for the II/II+'s encouraged you to do this on your own or to get the dealer to do it, or you wouldn't get the most out of their programs!

Top Picture: Personal Computing Magazine, 11/84
Bottom Picture: AppleDesign

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